Rosie Wylie: Bond Street Take Over

Rosie Wylie has taken over Bond Street.

Commissioned by the Royal Academy of Arts, Wylie has created a series of flags which are displayed along our luxury shopping street. The eye-catching designs are suspended above shoppers to celebrate the 250th year of art at the Royal Academy. See them in full force, take a stroll down Bond Street now.

Wylie decided to use details from her most recent body of work, Lolita’s House, which was exhibited at David Zwirner last month.

The title ‘Lolita’s House’ is only tangentially a reference to Nabokov’s famous novel. The inspiration for their collection has been derived from Wylie’s memories of a property opposite Wylie’s Kent home, outside which the neighbour’s teenage daughter would wash their car back in the 1970s.

The artworks here – made in Wylie’s deceptively simple and very witty style – rely on the artist’s memories of the period, mixing together fact and fiction.

This concept continues her ongoing fascination with the shifting nature of memory and the multi-layered external associations that become attached to it over time.

In celebration of 250 Years of Art, The Royal Academy of Arts and London’s West End have commissioned four celebrated artists to design street flags in each of their characteristic styles. Grayson Perry and Rose Wylie are joined by Joe Tilson and Cornelia Parker to inject some colour and creativity into London’s busy streets

The installation is made up of 200 flags and will be on view throughout Bond Street, Piccadilly, Regent Street and Regent Street St James’s.

Wander down London’s favourite luxury shopping quarter to see the bold flags and exclusive window collaborations from the 22nd June – 8th July 2018. Read more on the #RA250.

 

 

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See Fashion Celebrate Art with #RA250BondSt

Bond Street joins the art world in celebration of the Royal Academy’s 250th year.

The world-leading fashion and fine jewellery brands across Bond Street, Albemarle Street and Dover Street have unveiled an exclusive array of art inspired window installations,  from the 22nd June – 8th July 2018.

All of the participating brands can be found on the map below.

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Watch our short film below to see Tim Marlow, Artistic Director of the Royal Academy of Art’s interview Susan Morris, Farshid Moussavi, Alice Temperley, Kit Kemp and Declan Jenkins on their own creative process and influences to reveal how these unique art windows have been created.

See a taste of some of the installations below.

Temperley London has launch the two-week art extravaganza with two graduate artists from Edinburgh College of Art  Lia Chiarin and Emily Herring painting live in the window.

Lia has always been interested in story-telling through painting. Her paintings are about clues, rather than confrontation with her subject, which will make her a fascinating watch when she sits in Temperley London’s window to create a brand-new artwork for #RA250.

In the heart of Bond Street, Fenwick have commissioned France’s pre-eminent illustrator Pierre Le-Tan to create and construct a series of windows exploring the history of the world’s greatest Art Institution. Le-Tan has look at seminal figures such as George III, Joshua Reynolds, Gainsborough, Turner, William Blake, the school’s very first female student Laura Herford, and other, more modern figures of importance.

Moreau Paris have displaying the artwork “The Scene on the French Coast” from the British painter J.M.W. Turner. In addition, Moreau are offering exclusive nautical bags inspired by Turner’s dramatic seascapes for #RA250.

William & Son have partnering with Caroline Issa of Tank magazine, to produce two exclusive handbags. Inspired by the work of British artist, Jon Thompson’s Toronto Cycle – Northern Lights, yellow 2009 painting, the one-of-a-kind bags are being showcased in the window display, alongside the design journey and the original artwork that inspired such a bold design.

This is just a small selection of all the happenings to celebrate the Royal Academy’s 250th year.

Brands including Louis Vuitton, Hermès, Victoria Beckham, TODS, Longchamp, Amanda Wakeley, IWC, La Perla, Ermenegildo Zegna, AKRIS, Pal Zileri, Jimmy Choo, and Smythson are among the internationally renowned flagship stores participating in the project. Celebrated jewellers and watchmakers including Fabergé, Moussaieff, Mikimoto, Chatila, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Blancpain and Montblanc have also showcase exclusive displays to mark the Royal Academy’s anniversary.

Join us, the Bond Street, and the Royal Academy to celebrate art in the heart of the Mayfair.  Follow us (link to our instagram) to keep up to date with art exclusives, in store events and more. #RA250BondSt runs for two weeks only.

Bond Street For The RA250

The fashion and art worlds joined forces in celebration of the Royal Academy of Art’s 250th  year.

Bond Street’s world-leading fashion and fine jewellery brands collaborated with artists or designed their very own window display, exploring the theme of 250 years of art.

For the first time, Bond Street’s windows was transformed into a rich and diverse series of art installations, celebrating the theme 250 Years of Art from the 22nd June to 8th July 2018, coinciding with the Royal Academy’s 250th Summer Exhibition.

Alongside the installations, Royal Academician, Rose Wylie had a collection of flags suspended above Bond Street throughout the summer, as part of the broader celebration of 250 Years of Art in London’s West End, commissioned by the Royal Academy.

The display could be found Bond Street from the 22nd June to the 8th July. It has now come to end but you can still explore the best of the brand’s artistic endeavors, below as we reflect on our favourite window displays.

Put on in the heart of the West End, for an art institution that has inspired the world, we’re incredibly proud of the #RA250BondSt campaign and the joining of art and fashion communities. No where, but Bond St.

Pierre Le-Tan for Fenwick

Lia Chiarin for Temperly London

Tory Burch

Jager LeCoultre

Rimowa

Bond’s Best – Hermès Cavale Medium Seat Jumping Saddle

Ever since founder Thierry Hermès first began producing some of the finest harnesses and bridles for the carriage trade in Paris, comfort has reigned supreme in the brand’s equestrian collections.

For it’s latest piece, the Cavale saddle priced at £5,500, the French luxury brand asked champion show jumper Simon Delestre to help with the ergonomics. Meanwhile, a single craftsman works to the exact measurements of both horse and rider to ensure the perfect fit.

And don’t worry if you and your trusty steed are not quite showground ready. This seamless calfskin seat also makes an excellent general-purpose saddle. To choose, test and fit yours, contact one of the Hermès specialists in store.

Hermès, 155 New Bond Street

SHOP TACTICS WITH SAMUEL BAIL AND ABEL SAMET

Samuel Bail and Abel Samet are the creative duo behind London-based leather goods label, Troubadour. They first met whilst working at Mayfair financial advisory firm, Lazard, where, after lamenting about the lack of durable business bags, they decided to embark on a journey to create their own. Today, to the delight of globetrotters everywhere, their exquisite handcrafted designs are sold around the world. And for those shopping on Bond Street, a selection of pieces can also be found at Thom Sweeney on Bruton Place.

Vegetable-tanned leather, derived from the finest tanneries in the Italian region of Tuscany, underpins each unique piece. As Abel notes: “This tanning method is an all-natural process that creates exceptional leather, so that our products wear beautifully, last for years, and actually look better with age. We work with highly skilled artisans, whose leather-working techniques have been around for generations and therefore stand the test of time.” Samuel is also quick to note a blend of old-meets-new. “By combining these techniques with many modern innovations, each piece is more functional and technical than the bags our grandfathers once carried,” he adds.

Meanwhile, several of Troubadour’s existing products have proven to be much more popular with women than initially expected. This pleasant surprise inspired Samuel and Abel to develop a line of women’s bags, which will launch this summer.

Work aside, this sporty pair are gluttons for long distance races – running, swimming and cycling – and have both completed Ironman triathlons. Samuel, who just happens to be a former professional Canadian cyclist, also swam the English Channel last year. Here, they take a breather and share some of their favourite Mayfair addresses:

Raw Press at Wolf & Badger, 32 Dover Street

This is the place for mouth watering and healthy breakfast bowls. Make them yourself with soaked oats, coconut yoghurt, fresh berries, quinoa cereal and lots of toppings. The coffee is great as well. We suggest adding some coconut yoghurt and almond butter on top.

Brown’s Hotel, 33 Albemarle Street

Brown’s is ideal for a morning meeting. We especially like the comfortable chairs and its relaxed, quiet setting. The tea is always good and is served beautifully.

Rapha, 85 Brewer Street

We have a very active team and enjoy a morning ride around Richmond Park and a weekend ride into Kent. Rapha, though not in Mayfair, is where we pick up most of our cycling kit. The clothing is thoughtfully designed, comfortable, wears well and looks good.

28-50 Wine Workshop & Kitchen, Maddox Street

Many of the early Troubadour discussions were held over dinners here. It provides consistently great food and great wine in a casual setting.

Thom Sweeney, 33a Bruton Place

This is one of our favourite tailors in London. It boasts a great team and a super strong ready-to-wear collection, featuring everything from suits and sweaters, to ties and a selection of our latest Troubadour bags.

 

THE Q&A: Harvy Santos, milliner

Harvy Santos pink pom pom hat £930 exclusive to Fenwick Bond Street

No doubt visitors to the Fenwick hat department will have been tickled pink by the latest offering from London-based milliner, Harvy Santos. In particular, his aptly named ‘Fizzy Pop’ collection features raffia boaters, netted pillboxes and wide-brimmed Audrey Hepburn styles. But it is his playful use of colourful baubles, ruched silks and fluffy pompoms, which makes them so memorable.

“I probably drank too many fizzy drinks as a child and probably still do, since I can never say ‘no’ to champagne,” says Harvy. “There’s a certain crazy joy that comes from a sugar rush. I think most of us can remember that feeling, the thrill of which I wanted to capture in the form of a hat.” Indeed, his latest collection has both a graphic and comic sensibility mixed with a sense of childlike fun – hence the pompoms suspended on wires.

Photo courtesy of Harvy Santos

Born in the Philippines, Harvy started out as a ballet dancer in Hong Kong before going on to study millinery in London. Prior to launching his own label, he created hats for The Royal Opera House and worked with top British hatter, Stephen Jones. Today, Harvy fuses traditional millinery techniques with new materials in couture and hat collections from an atelier in North London.

Harvy Santos in his North London studio

With the British summer season nearly upon us, we ask the merry milliner who for the second year running is part of the Fenwick/Royal Ascot Millinery Collective, to share his tips on how best to impress at the most prestigious events on the social calendar. Here’s what he said:

BSN: How would you advise someone buying a special occasion hat for the first time?

H.S: Firstly, try on as many hats as you can. If you are matching a hat with a dress or another accessory (bag or shoes) bring them with you. In terms of face shape, if you have an oval and/or heart-shaped face, you could wear almost anything. If you have a round face, avoid wearing wide-brimmed hats on a horizontal, tilt it if you can – it’s usually flattering. Lastly, depending on what event you are wearing your hat to, I would suggest you think comfort. If you’re going to Royal Ascot, you will be there all day. You wouldn’t want to fumble and worry about your hat — you are there to have fun so comfort is key.

BSN: How important is hair and make-up when wearing a statement headpiece?

H.S: Hair and make-up also complete the entire look. I suggest getting a good hairdresser involved, especially if you have opted for a headpiece that has fiddly headbands or wires. The hairdresser can make those disappear, which would make your hat float on your head magically.

BSN: Britain is renowned for its hat-wearing culture. How does this influence your work?

H.S: A lot! I think the fact that the UK has a hat wearing culture inspires me more to create a new way of wearing tradition. In the UK, a lot of women dare to be different and some are naturally quirky and a bit eccentric and I love that. This then makes me push the boundaries a little without losing being stylish and elegant.

BSN: If you had to pick any fashion brands on Bond Street that would compliment your hats – what would they be?

H.S: A MaxMara jumpsuit would dress-up my ‘Nicole’ coolie hat. If you choose to wear a dress from Prada, then my ‘Sabrina’ beret would look fun and elegant and suit any special/formal occasion. Anything from the ‘Fizzy Pop’ collection would look fun paired with a trouser suit from La Perla, or even with their lingerie/nightdresses if you are going for the underwear-as-outerwear look of course!

 

 

SHOP TACTICS WITH TOM CHAMBERLIN


Tom Chamberlin killing time while having a suit measured in Kent, Haste & Lachter
– Photography by Foxall Studio & Elodie Nizon

Tom Chamberlin is the editor of men’s style bible, The Rake. Impeccably dressed and perfectly coiffed, Tom started out in television working on The X Factor, where he says: “I basically made tea and was an all-round dogsbody, even though it was a pretty amazing and dysfunctional entry into working life.”

Later, whilst having his hair cut at the barbers, he picked up a copy of Finch’s Quarterly Review and instinctively knew he wanted to work there. “It was witty, intelligent, beautiful and took the kind of irreverent tone that I like,” says Tom who was taken under the wing of its then editor-in-chief, Nick Foulkes. “No one has had a greater impact on how I work, dress and look at life today,” he says of his former editor and mentor.

 

In 2014 Tom joined The Rake. The renowned gentleman’s magazine had just moved from its home in Singapore to offices on London’s Upper Brook Street. As editor, Tom and his team have successfully built the brand, predominantly using front covers and interviews mixed with rich content and a good online strategy to become a leader in the field of men’s luxury publications. As for being slap bang in the middle of town, Tom adds: “Mayfair is at the epicentre of what The Rake is all about. I am very lucky to have my favourite places on my office doorstep.”

Meanwhile, the newlywed is gearing up for his next big challenge, fatherhood. And with a baby boy due any day now, Tom is already planning shopping expeditions to Mayfair, just as his father did with him. “My father taught me everything there is to know about the longevity of classic style from an early age,” he adds before taking us through his favourite addresses below:

 

Kent, Haste & Lachter, 7 Sackville Street

Terry Haste is my tailor, my mentor Nick Foulkes introduced me to him in 2010 and no experience since has been more thrilling or rewarding than having a bespoke suit made with him. He is to my mind the finest tailor in the world. Terry’s style mixes structured and unstructured tailoring which somehow takes into account both my psychological and physical needs. After all, clothes are meant to be an expression of self.  It also helps that he, John Kent and Stephen Lachter are tremendous fun to work with.

 

G.J. Cleverley, 13 Royal Arcade, 28 Old Bond Street

Shoes are a small (large) obsession of mine. I have big feet and that causes problems because you can ruin a look with clumsy, large shoes. When you go somewhere like Cleverley, a company that my father took me to when I was 16 to buy my first pair of proper shoes, you get every tradition of British craftsmanship at its best. I was hooked from then and have since been on a mission to trick people, through footwear, into thinking I am halfway elegant. Cleverley’s ‘Hague II’ loafers are, as far as I am concerned, as good as it gets.

 

Ralph Lauren, 1 New Bond Street

Ralph Lauren is a genius and a master of the Mise-en-scène. Here you will find my two favoured labels of the Ralph Lauren family. The sartorially led Purple Label which has the most wearable ready-to-wear suits for someone my size (and frankly most other sizes too). Then we have RRL, which could hitherto be found on Mount Street but has its own section in the store. I absolutely love the nostalgia for any of the many eras it is inspired by, Twenties Chicago, the Old West, Fifties Americana, the designs are imaginative and evocative and easy to chew up the day looking around.

 

Bellamy’s 18, Bruton Place

This is my favourite restaurant in London, or anywhere else. Gavin Rankin is the patron mange ici proprietor and knows how to run an establishment properly. He cut his teeth as the general manager of Annabel’s when it was actually good and he was also Mark Birley’s right-hand man. My wife has dreams about the smoked eel mousse but I recommend the fish fingers, not joking.

 

Davidoff of London, 35 St. James’s Street

Another vice that Nick Foulkes got me into is cigars. Nowhere is there a better riposte to anti-smoking legislation than Davidoff of London. Father and son team Edward and Eddie Sahakian, are two of the most generous and kind men in any industry I work with. They give very freely of their time and have encouraged a loyalty so engrained in me that even buying a cigar in a foreign country fills me with guilt. I do not drink, so cigars are my one vice, one that has become my most dedicated hobby.